[Updated] Biodiversity Hotspots in India and World

Biodiversity hotspots are regions of the world that contain a high level of biodiversity but are also threatened by human activities.

These hotspots are often located in tropical or subtropical climates, and generally have high levels of endemism, meaning that many of the species found there are not found anywhere else in the world.

Hotspots are home to a large number of species, and many of these species are endangered or threatened. Conservation efforts are focused on these areas in order to protect and preserve the unique biodiversity they contain.

Biodiversity hotspot’s main qualifying criteria

In order for an area to be declared a Biodiversity Hotspot, it must meet four criteria. These criteria include:

  1. Significant levels of biodiversity and endemism;
  2. A significant threat of habitat destruction;
  3. A significant loss of habitat; and
  4. A large human population is dependent on the area for resources.
  5. The area must be both globally and nationally significant: This means that the area is important not only to the local ecosystem but also to the global ecosystem. It also means that the area is of significance to the local government or community.
  6. The area has to have lost at least 70% of its original habitat: Habitat loss refers to the destruction of natural environments, such as forests, wetlands, and grasslands, that are essential for the survival of certain species.
  7. The area must contain at least 1500 species of vascular plants as endemics: Vascular plants are those that have specialized tissue for conducting water and nutrients throughout the plant. Endemic species are those that are native to a particular area and are not found anywhere else in the world.

Following the criteria there are four major biodiversity hotspots in India:

  1. The Himalayas
  2. The Western Ghats
  3. The Eastern Himalayas
  4. The Nicobar Islands.

Biodiversity Hotspots in India

Biodiversity Hotspots in India are areas with a high diversity of species, many of which are endemic (unique) to the region. They are defined by the World Wildlife Fund (WWF) as regions that contain at least 1,500 species of vascular plants (> 0.5% of the world’s total) as endemics and have lost 70% of their original habitat.

India has five such hotspots located in the Eastern Himalayas, the Western Ghats, the Indo-Burma region, the Nicobar Islands, and the Sundarbans. These hotspots are home to some of India’s most iconic species, including tigers, leopards, Indian elephants, and the great Indian one-horned rhinoceros.

They also contain an array of rare and threatened species, such as the Western Ghats and Nicobar Islands’ endemic species of frogs, toads, and geckos. Conservation efforts are needed to protect these hotspots from the threats posed by deforestation, over-exploitation of resources, and climate change.

The Himalayas

The Himalayas is a mountain range in Asia, extending 1,500 miles (2,400 km) across the border of India and China. It is home to the highest mountain in the world, Mount Everest, which stands at a height of 8,848 meters (29,029 ft). The Himalayas are home to some of the world’s most spectacular landscapes, as well as a wide variety of flora and fauna. The mountain range is a popular destination for trekkers, climbers, and mountaineers, who come to experience the unique landscape and culture of the region.

Sundarban

Sundarban is the world’s largest mangrove forest, located in Bangladesh and India. It is home to a variety of species of flora and fauna, including the Bengal tiger, Indian python, and the endangered Ganges River dolphin.

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It is a UNESCO World Heritage Site and is considered to be one of the most bio-diverse ecosystems in the world. The Sundarban is also known for its high degree of biodiversity, with more than 250 species of plants, 35 species of mammals, and 120 species of birds.

The Sunderban is an important source of livelihood for the local fishing and honey-collecting communities and is also an important source of fuel and timber for the villages.

Sundaland

Sundaland is a biogeographical region of Southeast Asia that encompasses the Malay Peninsula, the Sunda Islands (Sumatra, Java, Borneo, and their surrounding islands), the Maluku Islands (the Moluccas), and the western part of the Indonesian archipelago.

The region is characterized by its tropical rainforests and extensive biodiversity, which includes numerous endemic species

Sundaland is considered to be one of the most important biodiversity hotspots in the world and is home to a number of threatened species, including the Sumatran tiger, the Bornean orangutan, and the Sumatran rhinoceros.

Sundaland has been an important area for human habitation for thousands of years and is home to a number of ancient cultures and civilizations.

This region is home to a wide variety of species, including the tiger, elephant, rhinoceros, orangutan, and many more. The region is also home to some of the world’s most productive and diverse tropical forests.

The unique and varied ecosystems within Sundaland have resulted in a high level of endemism, with many species being found nowhere else in the world.

Indo Burma

Indo-Burma is a biogeographical region located in Southeast Asia. It is considered to be one of the eight major biogeographical regions of the world.

It covers an area of approximately 1.8 million km2, stretching from India in the west to China in the east and from Pakistan in the north to the Malay Peninsula and Sumatra in the south.

It is characterized by an abundance of tropical and subtropical moist broadleaf forests and includes some of the world’s most diverse and species-rich terrestrial ecosystems.

The region is home to a large variety of plants and animals, including some of the world’s most iconic species such as the Bengal tiger, Asian elephant, gibbon, and Asian rhinoceros.

Western Ghats & Sri Lanka

The Western Ghats mountain range is one of India’s most important natural reserves and is home to many rare and endangered species of flora and fauna.

It is a UNESCO World Heritage Site and is shared with the neighboring country of Sri Lanka. The Western Ghats extend from the Arabian Sea coastline in the west to the Eastern Ghats in the east and form a natural boundary between the two countries.

Sri Lanka is also home to a number of important biodiversity hotspots, including the Sinharaja Forest Reserve and Horton Plains National Park. Together, the Western Ghats and Sri Lanka are important sites for conservation and the preservation of biodiversity.

The Indo-Burma Region

The Indo-Burma region is a biodiversity hotspot that spans:

  • India
  • Myanmar
  • Thailand
  • Laos
  • Cambodia
  • Vietnam

This region is home to over:

  • 1,300 species of birds
  • 350 species of mammals
  • 1,200 species of plants

This region is home to some of the most threatened species in the world, including the Asian Elephant, Tiger, and Javan Rhino. It also supports a vast array of unique ecosystems, including tropical rainforests, deciduous forests, grasslands, and mangrove swamps.

This region is known for its rich cultural heritage, which includes the ancient cities of Angkor and Bagan, as well as the famous Golden Triangle. The region is threatened by deforestation, illegal wildlife trade, and unsustainable tourism, as well as the impacts of climate change.

Conservation efforts are underway to protect this region and its biodiversity, with increased efforts to protect species, strengthen anti-poaching initiatives, and create protected areas.

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The Terai-duar Savanna

The Terai-Duar Savanna is a type of grassland ecoregion in Nepal, India, and Bangladesh. It is characterized by an open canopy of tall grasses and shrubs, with occasional trees and a few groves of deciduous trees.

The terrain is generally flat, with occasional hills and patches of forest. This region is home to a variety of wildlife, including tigers, leopards, rhinoceroses, elephants, and many species of birds. The area is also important for the conservation of several rare species, such as the Asian elephant, Bengal tiger, and Ganges river dolphin.

4 Biodiversity Hotspots In India: Excellent Places To Relish Pure Adventures

  1. Eastern Himalayas:
    The Eastern Himalayas are home to some of the world’s most diverse and pristine ecosystems, including tropical and temperate forests, wetlands and grasslands, and alpine meadows. This region is home to many rare and endangered species, including the red panda, snow leopard, and Himalayan tahr.
  2. Western Ghats:
    This biodiversity hotspot is located along the western coast of India, stretching from Gujarat in the north to Kerala in the south. The Western Ghats are home to a wide range of wildlife, including tigers, elephants, leopards, and many endemic species.
  3. Sunderban Mangrove Forests:
    The Sunderban Mangrove Forests are a globally important conservation area located in the state of West Bengal. This area is home to an incredible variety of wildlife, including the endangered Royal Bengal Tiger, Indian Python, and River Dolphin.
  4. Great Nicobar Island:
    Located in the Bay of Bengal, the Great Nicobar Island is home to some of the most diverse and unique wildlife in India, including the Nicobar Pigeon, the Great Nicobar Flying Fox, and the Nicobar Parakeet. It is also home to many endangered species such as the Nicobar Megapode, the Nicobar Monitor Lizard, and the Nicobar Tree Frog.

6 Biodiversity Hotspots in India – Discover Nature, Adventure & Everything Between!

  1. The Western Ghats: This mountain range runs along the western coast of India and is home to an incredible array of biodiversity including threatened species like the lion-tailed macaque and the Great Indian Bustard. It is also home to hundreds of species of birds, reptiles, amphibians, and plants, making it one of the most important biodiversity hotspots in India.
  2. The Himalayas: This mountain range is home to over 600 species of birds, many of which are endangered. It is also home to some of the most endangered mammals in the world like the snow leopard, and red panda, …
  3. The Eastern Ghats: This region is home to a variety of flora and fauna, and is home to some of the most endangered species in India like the white-rumped vulture and sloth bear.
  4. The Deccan Plateau: This region is home to a variety of plant and animal species, many of which are endangered. It is also home to some of the most threatened species of birds in India like the king vulture, great hornbill, and red-headed vulture.
  5. The Sunderbans: This vast wetland is home to a variety of species, including the Bengal tiger and saltwater crocodile. It is also home to a wide variety of birds, reptiles, and amphibians.
  6. The Nilgiris: This mountain range is home to a variety of species, including the Nilgiri tahr and Nilgiri marten, both of which are endangered. It is also home to many species of birds, reptiles, and amphibians.

Biodiversity Hotspots in the world

Biodiversity hotspots are regions of the world with a high diversity of endemic species and a great deal of habitat loss. There are over 30 recognized biodiversity hotspots in the world. The hotspots are identified by Conservation International, and they include:

  1. Tropical Andes
  2. Sundaland
  3. Indo-Burma
  4. Mediterranean Basin
  5. Caribbean Islands
  6. Atlantic Forest
  7. California Floristic Province
  8. Western Ghats & Sri Lanka
  9. Cerrado
  10. Central Chile
  11. Coastal Forests of Eastern Africa
  12. Cape Floristic Region
  13. Succulent Karoo
  14. Mountains of Central Asia
  15. Guinean Forests of West Africa
  16. Madagascar & Indian Ocean Islands
  17. Himalaya
  18. Juan Fernández Islands
  19. Northern Andes
  20. Philippines
  21. Polynesia-Micronesia
  22. Southwest Australia
  23. Tumbes-Chocó-Magdalena
  24. New Caledonia
  25. Caucasus
  26. Irano-Anatolian
  27. New Zealand
  28. Tropical Dry Forests of Central America
  29. Western North America
  30. Eastern Afromontane
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There are three levels of biodiversity

  1. Species Biodiversity: This is the most basic level of biodiversity, referring to the variety of species within a particular habitat or region. This level of biodiversity is important for the health of ecosystems, as different species interact and depend on each other for survival.
  2. Genetic Biodiversity: This level of biodiversity refers to the variety of genetic material within a species, which can be found in different individuals of the same species. Genetic diversity is important for species to adapt to changing environments and helps ensure the long-term survival of the species.
  3. Ecosystem Biodiversity: This level of biodiversity refers to the variety of habitats and ecological processes within an area. This includes the diversity of landscapes, habitats, and species interactions. This level of biodiversity is important for the stability of ecosystems and their ability to cope with environmental changes.

Frequently Asked Questions About Biodiversity Hotspots

Q: What is a biodiversity hotspot?

A: biodiversity hotspot is a region of the world with a high concentration of endemic species, meaning species found only in that region. These regions are characterized by high levels of both species richness and endemism and are under threat from human activities. Biodiversity hotspots are home to more than two-thirds of the world’s species and cover only 2.3 percent of the Earth’s land surface.

Q: How many biodiversity hotspots are there in the world?

A: There are currently 30 recognized biodiversity hotspots in the world, containing over 150,000 species of plants and animals. These hotspots are located in tropical and subtropical regions, such as Central and South America, Africa, Southeast Asia, and the Caribbean.

Q: What are the major threats to biodiversity hotspots?

A: The major threats to biodiversity hotspots include habitat destruction and fragmentation, overexploitation, climate change, and invasive species. These threats are caused by human activities, such as deforestation, agricultural expansion, overfishing, and the introduction of non-native animals and plants.

Q: What is the importance of biodiversity hotspots?

A: Biodiversity hotspots are important because they are home to a large number of endemic species, which are species that are only found in that particular region. Biodiversity hotspots also provide a range of ecological services, such as nutrient cycling, soil formation, and pollination, which are essential for human survival. Furthermore, biodiversity hotspots are important for scientific research, as they provide an opportunity to study the interactions between species in complex and diverse ecosystems.

Q: How can we protect biodiversity hotspots?

A: The protection of biodiversity hotspots is essential for the conservation of global biodiversity. Strategies for protecting biodiversity hotspots include establishing protected areas, reducing threats from human activities, and promoting sustainable development. Additionally, educating local communities about the importance of biodiversity and engaging them in conservation efforts is essential for the long-term protection of these unique and important habitats.

Q: What is a biodiversity hotspot in India?

A: A biodiversity hotspot in India is an area with a high diversity of species and a large number of endemic species – species found only in that specific area. Biodiversity hotspots in India include the Western Ghats, Eastern Himalayas, and the Indo-Burma region.

Q: What types of plants and animals are found in India’s biodiversity hotspots?

A: India’s biodiversity hotspots are home to a wide range of plants and animals, from rare orchids and medicinal plants to tigers, elephants, and snow leopards. Many species are endemic, meaning they are found only in a specific region.

Q: What is the importance of biodiversity hotspots in India?

A: Biodiversity hotspots in India are important for preserving the unique and fragile ecosystems, as well as the many species that inhabit them. These areas also provide important resources for local communities, such as food, medicines, and other materials. In addition, they are important for research and education.

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